Friday, May 12, 2017

The Problem of Dark Data

Originally published by Katy Stein Badeaux.

A March New York Times article sounded warning bells for researchers: the scourge of dark data. Dark data doesn’t refer to anything secret or illegal, but rather data developed by the government and other organizations subject to loss. A more complete definition, often used in the corporate context, is “the information assets organizations collect, process and store during regular business activities, but generally fail to use for other purposes.” Concern over the loss of data that could lead to new discoveries has been especially equated with the loss of scientific data stored by agencies and other organizations. Much of this data is stored on government servers, with no legal obligation to remain available. The Trump administration’s proposed cuts to scientific research and agency funding has only increased the alarm felt by scientists and other researchers.
An additional problem is that dark data, by definition, is unknown. It can’t be verified if it can’t be found, even though we know it’s there. Somewhere. Right now, data.govis the central repository for government created databases, but it relies on agencies to self-report and is, by many researchers’ estimates, only a fraction of data created by the agencies. The use of proprietary code and’s practice of linking to data housed on websites, instead of the databases themselves, makes it even more difficult for researchers.
While there does not seem to be any federal legislation prohibiting the destruction or decentralization of these types of data, several non-profits have formed to save this data from going dark, by identifying and downloading  data viewed as vulnerable to deletion.
To learn more about dark data, here are some resources to get you started:
Politics: Turbulence Ahead (Nature)
A Decade of Discovery (podcast)
Use it or lose it—the search for enlightenment in dark data (
Dark Web: Exploring and Data Mining the Dark Side of the Web, Hsinchun Chen

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