Friday, January 20, 2017

Fifth Circuit Reverses Summary Judgment

Originally published by Thomas J. Crane.

In a per curiam decision, the Fifth Circuit reversed summary judgment for the employer. In Stennett v. Tupelo Public School District, No. 13-60783 (5th Cir. 7/30/2015), Ms. Stennett argued she was more qualified than the persons chosen for various district jobs. Ms. Stennett had formerly worked for the Tupelo Public School District for some 30 years, gradually rising up through the ranks. She was laid off and told she could re-apply for various jobs. She did apply for three different positions for the 2010-11 school year. She was not even interviewed. She was then 64 years old. TPSD then re-hired several former TPSD employees, who were much younger. Ms. Stennett was the only former administrator who was not re-hired by TPSD. The next school year, the plaintiff applied for seven different positions with TPSD and was not hired. She was only interviewed for two of the positions. Yet, the district court granted summary judgment. The employer argued that the teachers who were chosen were more qualified.

The Fifth Circuit reversed summary judgment. It found that in looking at the evidence as a whole, she was much more qualified than the persons who were selected for the positions. On that basis, it found there was sufficient issue of material fact. It said a reasonable jury could conclude Ms. Stennett was more qualified than the persons who were chosen. She was not even interviewed for a position as an Administrative Intern. The court also noted that the employer relied on subjective qualifications that were not included in the job postings. One principal, for example, was looking for someone “to kind of complement him.” Another wanted someone who could provide instructions to the teachers. As the court mentioned, reliance on previously undisclosed job requirements itself can raise a genuine issue of material fact.

This is an unusual case. The court even noted that unlike most cases involving one particular job, Ms. Stennett was turned down for multiple positions. It is difficult to accuse several different persons of discrimination. People just do not generally believe discrimination can occur across different persons. But, Ms. Stennett was able to show undisclosed job requirements, and a lack of explanation by one principal regarding why he did not even interview Ms. Stennett. The plaintiff also showed that the Superintendent had promised to help her find a new position, but did nothing to help her. The superintendent himself did not interview the plaintiff for one position for which he was the hiring official. All this, said the court, amounted to genuine issue of material fact. See decision here. The decision is not published. But, it should be. It goes into substantial detail regarding how to analyze pretextual explanations.


Curated by Texas Bar Today. Follow us on Twitter @texasbartoday.

from Texas Bar Today
via Abogado Aly Website

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